Money In Motion March 2013

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How & When to Sign Up for Medicare

Breaking down the enrollment periods and eligibility

Medicare enrollment is automatic for some of us. If you are age 65 and eligible to receive Social Security benefits (or married to someone eligible to receive them), then you are also automatically eligible for Medicare Part A (free hospital insurance) and Medicare Part B (medical insurance for which you pay premiums), a.k.a. “original Medicare”.1

If this is the case, then you’ll get a red-white-and-blue Medicare card in the mail 3 months before your 65th birthday.2

Others may need to sign up. You can apply to receive Medicare benefits even if you haven’t retired. If you’re coming up on 65 and you don’t yet receive Social Security benefits, SSDI or benefits from the Railroad Retirement Board, visit your local Social Security Administration office or dial (800) 772-1213 or go to www.ssa.gov to determine your eligibility.1,2

If you are eligible, you have the choice of accepting or rejecting Part B coverage. If you want Medicare Part A and Medicare Part B, then you should sign your Medicare card and keep it in your wallet. If you don’t want Part B, you put an “X” in the refusal box on the back of the Medicare card form, and send the form to the address shown right below where your signature goes. About four weeks later, you will get a new Medicare card indicating that you only have Part A coverage.3

When you are enrolled in Medicare Part A & Part B (sometimes called “original Medicare”), you can join a Medicare Advantage plan (Part C). Anyone enrolled in Part A, B or C becomes eligible for prescription drug coverage (Part D).1

If you are 65 or older and aren’t eligible for Medicare Part A, you can still sign up for Part B as long as you are a U.S. citizen or a legal resident of this country for five years or longer.1

If you choose not to enroll in Part B during your initial enrollment period, you have another annual chance to sign up for it during a “general enrollment period” from January 1 through March 31, with Part B coverage commencing July 1.1

If you already have medical insurance through a group health plan at your workplace or your spouse’s workplace, you can either enroll in Part B while you are still covered by that plan or enroll in Part B within eight months of leaving your job or losing your health coverage, whichever happens first.1

When can you add or drop forms of Medicare coverage? Medicare has enrollment periods that allow you to do this.

1) The initial enrollment period is seven months long. It starts three months before the month in which you turn 65 and ends three months after that month. You can enroll in any type of Medicare coverage within this seven-month window – Part A, Part B, Part C (Medicare Advantage Plan), and Part D (prescription drug coverage). If you don’t sign up for Part D coverage during the initial enrollment period, you may have to pay a penalty to add it later.4

2) Once enrolled in Medicare, you can only make changes in coverage during certain periods of time. For example, the annual enrollment period for Part D is October 15-December 7, with Part D coverage starting January 1. (You can also drop Part D coverage, leave one Part C plan for another, or switch from a Part C plan to original Medicare or vice versa in this period).4

3) There is also an annual open enrollment period from January 1-February 14. During this one, you can switch out of a Part C plan and go back to original Medicare with Part A & B coverage starting on the first day of the month following that switch. If you do this, you have until February 14 to also join a Part D plan if you want to add drug coverage to complement Parts A and B. Part D coverage kicks in at the start of the month after the Part D plan receives your enrollment form.4

Special situations. Individuals with end-stage kidney failure who need dialysis or a transplant may qualify for Medicare regardless of age. Upon diagnosis, they can contact the SSA. Medicare coverage usually takes effect three months after a patient begins dialysis. People with Lou Gehrig’s Disease (ALS) are automatically enrolled in Medicare as soon as they begin receiving SSDI payments. Americans who are under 65 and disabled also qualify for Medicare.2,3

Do you have questions about your eligibility, or that of your parents? Your first stop should be the Social Security Administration – (800) 772-1213 or www.socialsecurity.gov. You can also visit www.medicare.gov and www.cms.hhs.gov.

Citations
1 – www.socialsecurity.gov/pubs/10043.html#a0=2 [9/25/12]
2 – www.medicare.gov/sign-up-change-plans/get-parts-a-and-b/when-and-how-to-get-parts-a-and-b.html [2/27/13]
3 – www.slhn.org/Pay-Bills/FAQ/Medicare-FAQ.aspx#4 [2012]
4 – www.medicare.gov/Publications/Pubs/pdf/11219.pdf [10/12]</span>

What Beneficiaries Need To Know

What do you do when an account owner passes away? If your loved ones have invested, saved or insured themselves to any degree, you may be named as a beneficiary to one or more of their accounts, policies or assets in the event of their deaths. While we all hope “that day” never comes, we do need to know what to do financially if and when it does.

Legally, just who is a beneficiary? IRAs, annuities, life insurance policies and qualified retirement plans such as 401(k)s and 403(b)s are set up so that the accounts, policies or assets are payable or transferrable on the death of the owner to a beneficiary, usually an individual named on a contractual document that is filled out when the account or policy is first created.

In addition to the primary beneficiary, the account or policy owner is asked to name a contingent (secondary) beneficiary. The contingent beneficiary will receive the asset if the primary beneficiary is deceased.

Some retirement accounts and policies may have multiple beneficiaries. Charities are also occasionally named as beneficiaries. If you have individually listed one (or more) of your kids or grandkids as designated beneficiaries of your 401(k) or IRA, that designation will usually override any charitable bequest you have stated in a trust or will.1

A will is NOT a beneficiary form. When it comes to 401(k)s and IRAs, beneficiary designations are commonly considered first and wills second. Be mindful of who you select. If you willed your IRA assets to your son in 2008 but named the man who is now your ex-husband as the beneficiary of your IRA back in 1996, those IRA assets are set up to transfer to your ex-husband in the event of your death.1

If a retirement account owner passes away, what steps need to be taken? First, the beneficiary form must be found, either with the IRA or retirement plan custodian (the financial firm overseeing the account) or within the financial records of the person deceased. Beyond that, the financial institution holding the IRA or retirement plan assets should also ask you to supply:  a) A certified copy of the account owner’s death certificate  b) A notarized affidavit of domicile (a document certifying his or her place of residence at the time of death).

If the named beneficiary is a minor, a birth certificate for that person will be requested. If the beneficiary is a trust, the custodian will want to see a W-9 form and a copy of the trust agreement.2

If you are named as the primary beneficiary, you usually have three options for claiming the assets, regardless of what kind of retirement savings account you have inherited:

1) Open an inherited IRA and transfer or roll over the funds into it.

2) Roll over or transfer the assets to your own, existing IRA.

3) Withdraw the assets as a lump sum (liquidate the account, get a check).

Before you make ANY choice, you should welcome the input of a tax advisor, and discuss any limitations or consequences that may apply to your situation.2

What if you are a spousal beneficiary?

If that is the case, you may elect to:

1) Roll over or transfer assets from a traditional IRA, Roth IRA, SEP-IRA or SIMPLE IRA into your own traditional or Roth IRA, or an inherited traditional or Roth IRA.

2) Withdraw the assets as a lump sum.

3) Roll over or transfer qualified retirement plan assets from a 401(k), 403(b), etc. into your own retirement account, or take them as a lump sum.2,6

What if you are a non-spousal beneficiary?

If this is so, you may elect to:

1) Roll over or transfer assets from a traditional IRA, Roth IRA, SEP-IRA, SIMPLE IRA or qualified retirement plan into an inherited IRA.

2) Withdraw the assets as a lump sum.2

What if a qualified (i.e., irrevocable) trust is named as the beneficiary?

If that is the circumstance, the trustee has two choices:

1) Transfer assets from a traditional IRA, Roth IRA, SEP-IRA, SIMPLE IRA or qualified retirement plan into an inherited IRA.

2) Withdraw the assets as a lump sum.2

The next calendar year will be very important. Inheritors of retirement accounts have until September 30 of the year following the original account owner’s death to review and remove beneficiaries, and until December 31 of that year to divide the IRA assets among multiple beneficiaries. Usually, December 31 of the year after the original retirement plan owner’s passing is the deadline for the first RMD (Required Minimum Distribution) from an inherited traditional or Roth IRA.3,4

Now, how about U.S. Savings Bonds?

If you are named as the primary beneficiary of a U.S. Treasury Bond, you have three options:

1) Redeem it at a financial institution (you will need your personal I.D. for this).

2) Get the security reissued in your name or the names of multiple beneficiaries. You do this via Treasury Department Form 4000, which you must sign before a certifying officer at a bank (not a notary). Then you send that signed form and a certified copy of the death certificate to a Savings Bond Processing Site.

3) Do nothing at all, as the primary beneficiary automatically becomes the bond owner when the original bond owner passes away.5

What about savings & checking accounts?

Bank accounts are often payable-on-death (POD) assets or “Totten trusts.” All a beneficiary needs to claim the assets is his or her personal identification and a certified copy of the death certificate of the original account holder. There is no need for probate. (Some states limit charities and non-profits from being POD beneficiaries of bank accounts.)5

How about real estate?

Lastly, it is worth noting that about a dozen states use transfer-on-death (TOD) deeds for real property. If you live in such a state, you have to go to the county recorder or registrar, usually with a certified copy of the death certificate and a notarized affidavit which informs the recorder or registrar that ownership of the property has changed. If the deed names multiple beneficiaries and some are dead, the surviving beneficiaries must present the recorder or registrar with certified copies of the death certificates of the deceased beneficiaries.5

Citations
1 – smartmoney.com/taxes/estate/how-to-choose-a-beneficiary-1304670957977/ [6/10/11]
2 – www.schwab.com/public/file/P-1625576/CS13416-02_MKT13598-10_FINAL_118091.pdf [12/10]
3 – etirementwatch.com/IRASample4.cfm [1/31/13]
4 – retirementwatch.com/IRASample1.cfm [1/31/13]
5 – nolo.com/legal-encyclopedia/claim-payable-on-death-assets-32436.html [1/31/13]
6 – montoyaregistry.com/Financial-Market.aspx?financial-market=who-should-inherit-your-ira-andor-401k&category=22 [1/31/13]Citations.

 

 

 

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